The “Statistics” of Anecdotes!

 

An anecdote is a statistic with a sample size of one. OK, maybe a sample size of a small
group of your closest friends and fellow travelers.

 

 

Consider this. Suppose you see a hair product advertisement and they tell you that 75% of the females who used this confirmed the product worked wonders. No
one stops to check if there really was a study conducted, or what was the population considered and how the sample was drawn. They just accept it as it is and buy the
product. In a world that is getting increasingly obsessed with
brands and consumer sales promotion, facts and data are being replaced by what one would call anecdotal statistics.

We have all seen various ads promoting various items like nutrient pills, body products,etc. The common factor in this? Lack of accurate and scientific research.
These companies often “cherry pick” anecdotal evidence to suit their case the best. So a common man who’s unaware of the falsity and inaccuracy of the claim, is easily
swayed by the “facts”. In an article “Why Anecdotal Evidence is Unreliable”, Jim Frost, technical writer at MINITAB, explains how statistics debunks the tall claims
made on the basis of anecdotal evidences, considering the example of rasberry ketones’s supposed health benefits as explained by Dr Oz. The article throws light on the
the significant errors made while assuming these anecdotes and why one must rely on statistics.SO in the end, ask yourself this

HAVE YOU EVER BEEN SWAYED BY AN ANECDOTE??

If yes then click to know more: blog.minitab.com/blog/adventures-in-statistics-2/why-anecdotal-evidence-is-unreliable

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